Best Children Book Publishers

Nobody is born with a publisher; every writer in history was once unagented and rejected! Fortunately, some publishing houses, such as the ones listed below, accept unpublished writing. 

First and foremost, Scholastic is the premier publisher of children’s books.

According to the famous description, Scholastic, the world’s largest publisher, and distributor of children’s books, works a little differently than the other publishers. Scholastic mesmerizes itself in schools so that no other publisher hosts book fairs and instructional reading groups.

  • Holiday House:

It is a children’s book publisher that produces both fiction and nonfiction. This well-known publisher specializes in hardcovers, including picture books for children as young as six, chapter novels for children as young as nine, middle-grade literature for children as young as thirteen, and young adult literature for children as young as fourteen. Send a hard copy of your full work to Editorial Department, Holiday House, and 425 Madison Ave., New York, NY 10017 to submit your work. Holiday House does not return manuscripts that are not accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope (SASE).

  • Charlesbridge:

Charlesbridge is looking for writings that bring new voices, ideas, and opinions to develop lifelong learners. They accept board stories, picture books, beginning literature, and young adult novels. 

Its fiction selections have narratives that are interesting and driven, as well as appealing characters. Geography, math, science, the arts, and diversity are among topics covered in nonfiction publications. Send a cover letter with your personal information, previously published works, and relevant writing experience to submit a manuscript. Each sort of manuscript has its own set of submission rules, so be sure to check the submissions guidelines page for detailed information on your piece.

Charlesbridge seems to have many followers and a newsletter that you can subscribe to on its website to be informed about the publishing house’s activities and campaigning.

  • Chicago Review Press:

This prestigious publishing business accepts submissions in practically every category, including children and young genre fiction books. Every year, Chicago Review Press publishes around 60 exclusives, and the work it selects is judged on its originality. It is looking for nonfiction writings on a variety of topics in particular. It is important to note that it will not publish picture books and is currently not taking fiction submissions.

While Chicago Review Press has won multiple accolades for its “For Kids” children’s book line, it is open to any children’s book, so give it a shot since it appreciates long-term partnerships with its authors. It’s better to initially send a quick query to one of the editors and then submit the whole document afterward.

  • Sleeping Bear Press:

Sleeping Bear Press is a major children’s book publisher based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, publishing exciting children’s books. The company began in 1988 with the publication of “The Legend of Sleeping Bear” and has since earned a reputation as one of the top children’s book publishers, winning numerous accolades, as well as a high appreciation for its smart content creation.

Sleeping Bear Press publishes both fiction and nonfiction picture books and middle-grade novels. For the time being, it only takes email submissions. Attach your manuscript as a Word document, and include your cover letter. Do not attach cover letters as attachments; fill in your full name, postal address, any previous publication experience, book word count, and a brief overview of your work in the body of the email.

  • Boyds Mills Press:

Boyds Mills & Kane is a children’s publishing house that focuses on compassionate, educational fiction and nonfiction. Picture books, beginning fiction and nonfiction, literature, and teen nonfiction are now being sought by this publishing house. The Submissions page of Boyds Mills & Kane includes an editor want list for each of its top editors, which can help you figure out what has a better chance of being accepted. When sending your work by email, provide the name of the editor you’d want to contact, as well as the title of your book, category, and word count. There are additional requirements for each genre of fiction and nonfiction, so make sure to check those boxes when submitting.

  • Kane Miller Press:

EDC Publishing’s Kane Miller Press is a part of the company. It publishes picture books in a variety of genres, with a focus on stories with American themes. It’s looking to grow its picture book catalog, so if that’s your thing, this could be a good fit.

Kane Miller also accepts community-focused chapter books and middle-grade fiction. The type of book is looking for true stories told by those who have lived them.

Are you convinced that this publishing house is the correct fit for you? 

If your book is lengthy, you can also include a synopsis and a sample chapter. Include the book’s word count as well as a 5-sentence professional biography in the body. Your letter should be addressed to “The Editors.”

  • Phaidon:

Picture books, quirky books, and board books are among the illustrated children’s books published by Phaidon for children aged 0 to 8. It only accepts content consistent with the Phaidon brand, so browse the publisher’s store to learn more about what it is looking for.

While Phaidon accepts anonymous submissions, it prioritizes submissions from agents. Send your query letter, book idea, and the whole manuscript to [email protected] to be considered for publication.

  • Mighty Media Press:

Mighty Media Press searches for literature and media that stimulate a child’s interest in learning, creativity, social awareness, and exploration. It places such a premium on these factors that it will not publish novels that meet these standards. It creates picture books for children under six, junior readers for children aged eleven, and middle-grade fiction and nonfiction for children aged thirteen.

When submitting to Mighty Media Press, you must include your email address on the submissions page. After that, Mighty Media will offer you a link to upload the cover letter of your work, synopsis, and up to 30 pages of your manuscript.

  • Pagestreet Publishing:

This publisher is still comparatively unknown, yet it has a solid reputation. Children’s books, including picture books (fictional and factual) and young adult novels, are particularly interesting to Pagestreet Publishing. Its collection of illustrated children’s books is growing, making it a wonderful place to send unsolicited contributions.

Send your script and a brief query by email, along with your book as a Word attachment (if it’s a text-only book) or a PDF attachment (if it’s an illustrated book). Your query letter should include a bio that outlines your career, publication history, social media presence, and whether or not you are represented by an agency, as well as your synopsis, proposal, and target age range. And any other communicative approach about your application.

  • Flashlight Press:

Flashlight Press is a well-known children’s book publisher that specializes in publications for very young readers. Their novels frequently offer humorous and heartwarming depictions of interpersonal behavior and multiculturalism, conveyed through great text and high-quality drawings. It’s asking for books aimed at kids aged 4 to 8.

Take a peek at the prior works released by this publishing firm to see if your book is a good fit for Flashlight Press. Your children’s book must be under 1,000 words long, have a common thread, and address family or social issues.

Multiple submissions are acceptable as long as you inform them if another publisher wishes to pursue your novel.

  • Albert Whitman & Company:

Picture books, middle-grade fiction, and young adult novels are all being sought by Albert Whitman & Company.

  • Allen & Unwin Book Publishers:

Despite its name, Allen & Unwin Book Publishers’ Friday Pitch online submission system is accessible all week, allowing writers of all book genres to get their work in front of one of the company’s in-house submission judges.

  • Annick Press:

Anonymous submissions of picture books, middle-grade fiction, YA fiction, and nonfiction for children of all ages are welcome at Annick Press.

  • Arbordale Publishing:

Arbordale seems to be on the lookout for innovative ideas for scientific and math-themed picture books, as well as books with fascinating storylines, both fictitious and real.

  • August House:

August House has a special section for oral traditions and horror stories from the oral culture. They publish books with lesson instructions and prefer stories about underrepresented cultures, Civilizations, beliefs, rituals, and customs. 

  • Cardinal Rule Press:

Cardinal Rule Press’ purpose is to publish “actual, relevant books for a wide range of community children,” according to the company’s website. They’re dedicated to creating books that reflect our world’s diversity and motivate readers to make a difference.

  • Charlesbridge Publishing:

Books that build a healthy and positive perspective and encourage young readers to embrace their sense of curiosity and fun are favored by Charlesbridge. Their purpose is to create lifelong readers and to support local, independent bookstores, particularly those owned by people of color.

  • Eerdman’s Books for Young Readers:

Eerdman’s Books is known for creating books that respect a wide range of religious perspectives and traditions.

  • Flashlight Press

Flashlight Press favors works with universal topics, such as social relationships and family life that are funny and heartwarming. They write novels for children from four to eight that are no more than 1,000 words long. 

  • Flying Eye Books:

Flying Eye is the award-winning visual publishing business Nobrow Publishing’s children’s imprint. Unprompted entries of children’s picture books and illustrated nonfiction are accepted.

  • Free Spirit Publishing:

Free Spirit Publishing’s purpose as a leading publisher of learning resources for kids and educators is to provide young readers with the tools they need to think for themselves, conquer any problem, and change the world for the better.

  • Hogs Back Books:

Hogs Back Books specializes in picture books for children up to the age of ten, early readers for children up to the age of fourteen, and YA literature. They accept submissions from both agents and authors who an agent does not represent.

  • Holiday House:

Holiday House focuses on high-quality hardcovers, including fiction and nonfiction, ranging from picture books to young adults. Children’s books for readers aged four and up are welcome to be submitted.

  • Medium:

Medium only publishes picture books for children; no novels, chapter books, YA/teen fiction, or 50,000-word novellas are accepted.

  • Kane Miller EDC Publishing:

Kane Miller produces a wide range of publications for young readers, from baby books to teen fiction and nonfiction.

  • Levine Querido (formerly Arthur A. Levine Books):

Levine Querido is looking for picture books, novels, and illustrations by artists and writers from underrepresented communities, such as BIPOC, LGBTQIA+, Latinx, and other minorities and those with disabilities.

  • Quarto Knows:

No novels, only chapter books. Each category/imprint has its editor at the Quarto Group. Unagented entries in a variety of educational fiction and nonfiction works are considered.

  • Sleeping Bear Press:

From January 1st to March 31st, Sleeping Bear is only accepting email submissions. They’re searching for BIPOC or LGBTQIA+ youngsters (ages 4 to 10) or children from LGBTQIA+ families to tell their tales.

  • Tilbury House Publishers:

Tilbury House publishes award-winning nonfiction picture books with strong educational content for both the trade and educational markets. Cultural diversity, social justice, mindfulness, nature, science, and the environment are among the topics they cover.

  • Workman Publishing:

Unagented nonfiction book entries for children and adults are welcome at Workman. They do not accept unsolicited picture book manuscripts and do not publish literature.

Conclusion:

By now, you should understand that the answer to the question, “Who is the finest children’s book publisher?” is largely dependent on the type of books you produce. Publishers get many requests and clients of submissions for children’s literature each year, but they can only choose a handful or so that they believe will “make their dollar.” When contemplating where to send your children’s book project, writers are understandably intimidated by the tiny prospects of being published. In response to your second question, “What types of children’s books are publishers searching for?” there are publishers for every marketable children’s book concept. All of the publishers you contact doesn’t have to be interested in your book. Only one is required. What are your plans for today to locate them?

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